An Early 2004 Revisit to

 "The Little River That Could"

Nevada's Amargosa River

 

See Below for Links to Previous Pages on the Subject

 

To refresh your memory, the Amargose River is what overpowers the evaporation going on all the time in Death Valley, and during Ice Ages it fills the bottom of that valley with its recurring Lake Manly!

Here is the map to orient you again, note the location of Amargosa Canyon (and note that where it says Tecopah Valley it is neither:  Tecopa has no "h" and the valley is Greenwater.  Where the "h" is now lies Chicago Valley):


So, this time we are actually going to follow the river partway through Amargosa canyon.  Are you excited?  Scared?  Be both, it is good for you to exercise your emotions!

Are you excited yet?  Come on, the magic won't work unless you believe!

As a refresher on where we left off a couple of years ago, here is a small lake in the center of Greenwater Valley, fed by seeps and springs and quite salty because of continual evaporation (salt grass is about all that is growing here).

As noted before, the contrast in vegetation where there is water and where there is not is quite striking.  This is a seep-fed tributary with much vegetation, a variety of trees and shrubs as compared with the place in the center of the valley where the water sits and evaporates and gets too salty to support this kind of life:

In our original visit to the Amargosa River, we had to be satisfied with saying good-bye to the river here at this sign where the river leaves Tecopa, with its spring and seep donations, and flows through a real canyon.  Then we felt we should not risk the little low-riding Buick on the dirt road to the canyon (not knowing it was flat and only a half mile long then!

The road follows the river to an entrance into the canyon.  It is a pedestrian canyon.  The actual physical canyon starts up here already:

Last time we left Amargosa Canyon to your imagination, saying simply that it lies under the first ridge shown in this picture, which is taken looking back, northeastward, into the southern end of the valley that holds Tecopa:

Last time, we showed the river again as it emerged from its canyon and flows past some sizable sand dunes south of Tecopa, as it makes its turn to the west under the road that can take you from Shoshone to Baker:

We then picked up the river once more after it had entered Death Valley.   There are links, below, to allof those places.

BUT, this time, we are going to follow the river through the Amargosa Canyon!  See the next page to start into what may be the equivalent of Dante's descent into hell!  I have no idea how that could be true, but it is a catchy thought.

First a praiseworthy external link:

 TTRR Icon Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad   Within that link there is a set of pages describing the Amargosa Canyon:  It is very well done!  Click here and enjoy it (or get the bigger picture about a unique western railroad by clickin on the T&TRR link first).  I refer to this site from time to time in the pages that follow.  I learned a lot about this place from the T&TRR site, and in particular from the author of the Amargosa Canyon pages.

GO TO AMARGOSA CANYON Part 1: Leaving Las Vegas

GO TO AMARGOSA CANYON Part 2: Dallying Above Greenwater Valley (erroneously called "Tecopah" Valley in the maps above).

GO TO AMARGOSA CANYON Part 3: Entering the Canyon !

GO TO AMARGOSA CANYON Part 4: A Half Mile In and Southward

GO TO AMARGOSA CANYON Part 5: Return to Tecopa

GO TO AMARGOSA CANYON Part 6: The Afterglow !

 Go Home to More in 2004 page

Go Home to Main Web Site page

Revisit Individual Amargosa River pages:

Go to first Amargosa River page: Orientation

Go to second Amargosa River page: Helpers

Go to third Amargosa River page: Northern Reach

Go to fourth Amargosa River page: Amargosa Valley

Go to fifth Amargosa River page: South of Eagle Mountain

Go to sixth Amargosa River page: In Death Valley

Hey, that's enough links for one page, isn't it?